George Henry Kettle - Allesley

Harry Kettle Peal Board
George Henry Kettle The memorial peal board
in Allesley Ringing Room
(Click to enlarge)

 

CCCBR Rolls of Honour Details

Rank: Private

Service No: 34988

Date of Death: 28/11/1917

Age: 34

Regiment/Service: Royal Berkshire Regiment 5th Bn.

Grave Reference: XXX. N. 2A. C

emetery:ETAPLES MILITARY CEMETERY

Additional Information:
Son of C. and L. M. Kettle; husband of Susan Ellen Kettle, of Rectory Cottage, Allesley, Coventry, Warwickshire.

George Henry (Harry) Kettle’s name is recorded on the War Memorials in both All Saints Church, Allesley Village Hall and on a Peal Board in All Saints Belfry. His name also appears in ‘The Great War Memorial Book of Church Bell-Ringers’ in St Paul’s Cathedral, London.

George Henry Kettle was baptised on the 12th November 1882 at Solihull, the son of Charles Joseph Kettle, a gamekeeper from Berkswell and his wife Laura Maria. By the age of 17 he was living in Church Lane, Allesley and working as a gardener. In 1909 he married Susan Ellen Crumpton from Stourbridge, Worcestershire and in the 1911 Census they are recorded as living in Allesley. They had a son Ralph Henry, born in 1914.

In 1917, at the time of Harry’s death, his wife Susan was living in Rectory Cottage, Allesley.

Harry Kettle was head gardener to Archdeacon Bree, the Rector of Allesley. He was also Ringing Master of the Allesley band of ringers. In addition he served two years as Hon. Sec. of the Warwickshire Guild of Bell Ringers.

On December 14th 1912 a Peal of Grandsire Doubles, the first ever Peal by a local band of ringers, was rung on the six bells of All Saints Allesley. It was the first Peal for all the ringers except for the conductor, Harry Kettle. It was his first Peal as conductor.

This was the third Peal that Harry rang at Allesley - he had only rung his first ever Peal the previous May. So the rapid progress of his ringing and conducting expertise represents a remarkable achievement. He rang seven peals in total at Allesley, the last being in May 1914.

Following his death a Peal was rung in his memory at Allesley by members of the Warwickshire Guild. This took place on December 15th 1917. The bells were half-muffled as a token of respect and esteem. Several of the ringers had taken part in the “local first” Peal in 1912. An engraved and gilded glass memorial peal board commemorating this event was erected in All Saints’ Belfry.  

Amanda Slater